In The News

Mount Sinai acquires 68Ga-DOTATOC PET for imaging rare neuroendocrine tumors

Mount Sinai acquires 68Ga-DOTATOC PET for imaging rare neuroendocrine tumors

Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are rare neoplasms of neuroendocrine origin. Neuroendocrine tumors are solid malignant tumors that arise from dispersed neuroendocrine cells found throughout the body. They are well known for their heterogeneity which makes it difficult to obtain uniform clinical data and establish universal guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of NETs. NETs are characterized by overexpression of somatostatin receptors, which can be visualized and targeted by radiolabeled somatostatin analogues. 111In-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-octreotide scintigraphy (111In-Octreotide) with single photon emission tomography (SPECT) is currently the standard imaging modality for evaluating patients with NETs. 111In Octreotide is the only FDA approved radiopharmaceutical available on the market for assessing the extent of involvement by NETs at both staging and follow up periods. However, the sensitivity of this imaging modality is lower compared to the positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer 68Ga-DOTA -Tyr3]octreotide (68Ga-DOTA-TOC). Importantly, the radiation exposure of 68Ga-DOTATOC PET is lower than that of 111In Octreotide and also the imaging with 68Ga-DOTATOC PET scan yields fast read-outs on the same day compared to 24-48 hour read-outs with 111In Octreotide scan. These advantages make the 68Ga labeled somatostatin analog more attractive from both the patient and management perspectives. The improved resolution and quantitation of uptake obtained with Ga-68 DOTATOC PET should provide a more accurate assessment of somatostatin receptor density, which will lead to a more accurate prediction of treatment response to somatostatin analogues.